History of Photography

The details were introduced as a gift to the world in 1839, a date generally accepted as the birth year of practical photography. The metal-based daguerreotype process soon had some competition from the paper-based calotype negative and salt print processes invented by William Henry Fox Talbot.

Birth of Photography

Nicéphore Niépce's earliest surviving camera photograph, 1826 or 1827: View from the Window at Le Gras (Saint-Loup-de-Varennes, France)

Etymology

A camera obscura used for drawing images

Development of chemical photography

It is a view of a busy street, but because the exposure time was at least ten minutes the moving traffic left no trace.

Robert Cornelius, self-portrait, Oct. or Nov. 1839, approximate quarter plate daguerreotype. The back reads, "The first light picture ever taken."

One of the oldest photographic portraits known, made by Joseph Draper of New York, in 1839[9] or 1840, of his sister, Dorothy Catherine Draper.

A calotype print showing the American photographer Frederick Langenheim (circa 1849). Note, the caption on the photo calls the process Talbotype

Roger Fenton's assistant seated on Fenton's photographic van, Crimea, 1855.

Mid 19th century "Brady stand" photo model's armrest table, meant to keep portrait models more still during long exposure times (studio equipment nicknamed after the famed US photographer, Mathew Brady).

A photographer appears to be photographing himself in a 19th-century photographic studio. Note clamp to hold the poser's head still. An 1893 satire on photographic procedures already becoming obsolete at the time.

The first durable color photograph, taken by Thomas Sutton in 1861

DSLR

The photographer can see the motive before taking an image by the mirror. When taking an image the mirror will swing up and light will go to the sensor instead.

 1. Camera lens  2. Reflex mirror  3. Focal-plane shutter  4. I mage sensor  5. Matte focusing screen  6. Condenser lens  7. Pentaprism/pentamirror  8. Viewfinder eyepiece